HARRINGTON LIBRARY HOURS FOR SUMMER INTERSESSION

HARRINGTON LIBRARY HOURS FOR SUMMER INTERSESSION:

Monday-Thursday

8:00 am – 4:00 pm

Friday

8:00 am – 2:00 pm

Saturday

Closed

April 30 & May 1

Closed

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Lecture: Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago

Last-Is-More-book-jacket-tn

Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago On the eve of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s 129th birthday, writer Robert Sharoff and photographer William Zbaren will discuss Mies’s final commission, the IBM Building, as well as his Chicago legacy. “Mies spent the last three decades of his life living and working in Chicago and his style eventually came to define the city in much the same way Baron Haussmann’s does Paris and Bernini’s does Rome,” said Sharoff. The 52-story IBM Building, the drawings for which were completed several weeks before Mies’s death in 1969, was the most expensive office building in the city’s history. It also represented the culmination of a half-century spent exploring the possibilities of steel and glass design. During its construction, New York Times critic Ada Louise Huxtable posited that the IBM Building “may well be the most important skyscraper in the country.” The IBM Building came midway through a legendary period in Chicago architecture – the decade-long building boom between 1965 and 1975 when Mies’s influence was at its most pervasive and his students and acolytes produced such enduring landmarks as McCormick Place, Lake Point Tower and the John Hancock Center. These buildings continue to dominate the city’s skyline and are at the heart of Chicago’s claim to be the founding city of American modernism. More:http://www.landmarks.org/snapshots.htm

Exhibition: Shaker Design

shaker_2015As It Is In Heaven: The Legacy of Shaker Design and Faith

  • Dates: 04 Feb – 26 Apr, 2015
  • Location: Loyola University Museum of Art, Chicago, IL
  • Address: 820 North Michigan Ave
  • Website: http://luc.edu/luma/
Included in this exhibition are rare examples of gift drawings. These moving and sincere images were drawn in the mid-1800s. Shaker brothers and sisters created them to motivate one another to greater faith and love for their community at a time when Shaker membership numbers were falling. These drawings are on loan from the collections of Eric Maffei, and David Schorsch and Eileen Smiles.Also included are examples of gift songs. The Shakers produced thousands of songs using their own musical notation system. Shaker music is perhaps best known by the song “Simple Gifts,” popularized by American composer Aaron Copland in his orchestral suite, “Appalachian Spring.” The songs are on loan from the Hamilton College Archives in Clinton, New York, and several private collections.

In addition to the gift drawings and gift songs, this exhibition has several outstanding pieces of furniture and objects from collectors in the Midwest, including: Robert and Janice Campbell; James and Lori Gelbort; Ray and Judy McCaskey; and Thomas and Jan Pavlovic.

(taken from the Society of Architectural Historians website)

 

Exhibition

Treatise: Why Write Alone?

The Graham Foundation is pleased to present Treatise: Why Write Alone?—an exhibition and publication project that brings together fourteen young design offices to consider the architectural treatise as a site for theoretical inquiry, experimentation, and debate. Organized by Chicago and Los Angeles-based designer Jimenez Lai, the project grows out of a recent Graham Foundation grant to Lai, whose interest in discursive practices and non-conformist approaches to architecture led him to ask his peers working in the realm of conceptual architecture: Why write? And, why write alone? In response to these questions, Treatise presents an exhibition of works by this core group of designers as well as an individual treatise from each office. Together, the exhibition and publications provide a platform to investigate the collective and individual stakes that emerge from this temporary alliance of designers as they explore architecture’s representational limits and possibilities.

Opening January 23, 2015, the exhibition features over 200 works, from drawings and models to multi-media installations, by design offices that utilize diverse—and often unexpected—strategies, forms, and materials.